Build Tips!

Discussion in 'Guides, Mods, and Upgrades' started by PsyVision, Jan 4, 2016.

Tags:
  1. PsyVision

    PsyVision Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    798
    Likes Received:
    248
    So RichRap (Rich Horne) started posting up some really good build tips on the Google+ discussion earlier today so in a bid to get more activity in the forum I thought it might be good to have people list some of their build tips here.

    Inserting Nuts Into 3D Printed Parts - Jos van der Plas
    If you still can't get them in, you can use a hobby knife to cut away some plastic.

    I also found it useful in some places to use a mini clamp to press them in. This worked really well!

    [​IMG]


    BigBox Frame Nut Traps
    "After trying to fit the first nut-trap - and it falling out many times then cross threading... I really did not like the idea of using sticky tape, so I put every single square nut into each plastic trap and added a small blob of superglue to each one - just allow it to run into the gap between the nut and the plastic, keep away from the thread, but don't worry if you do get superglue over the thread, it will not stop construction at all."

    [​IMG]

    Motor Cable Slack
    "Label the cables, using blue-tape and a marker or if you can find them, these awesome write on cable-ties.

    Also consider giving some slack on all your cable ends. And then make sure you fix anything that may move with a loop - the motor's are well worth doing with some longer cable-ties, I like to make sure all my motor cables are well supported."

    [​IMG]

    Z-Axis Cable Mount Photo / Tip

    "I used some superglue on the underside of all the cable-chain mounts, this is how they are orientated, as it can be a little hard to see on the build photo's.

    Also the cable ends need to be removed from the chain, they are not seperate parts."
    [​IMG]
     
    Mike Kelly likes this.
  2. PsyVision

    PsyVision Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    798
    Likes Received:
    248
    Dual Hot End PTFE
    Remember (as it's quite a small note on the current drawing) that the PTFE tube is longer (66mm) for the dual rather than the 63mm for the single.
     
  3. Falc.be

    Falc.be Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    38
    I always use a tool like this for inserting bearings, I normally use this for rc cars

    [​IMG]
     
  4. PsyVision

    PsyVision Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    798
    Likes Received:
    248
    Stepper Voltages
    Sanjay - "Between 0.55 and 0.60v is what you're looking for. Which is at about 7 O'clock for the flat part of the adjustment dial."
     
    Sanjay likes this.
  5. K3LAG

    K3LAG Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2015
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    21
    This tip may be a bit US centric, but there may be similar choices elsewhere. For those needing a large, temporary platform for building their BigBox consider the following: Go to Harbor Freight and buy a pair of their folding saw horses for about $20. Then go to your local home improvement store (Home Depot, Lowes, Menard's, etc) and buy a cheap 28"x80" interior door for less than $30. It gives you a large working space and when you are done you can slide the door behind a sofa and stash the folding saw horses just about anywhere. Next time you need to do a similar project just pull them back out.
     
  6. K3LAG

    K3LAG Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2015
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    21
    Another one: When working with small hardware and parts, work over a towel. The towel will keep any dropped parts from bouncing away and keep you from having to crawl around on the floor looking for things. You want a towel that is a bit fluffy. I usually use an old hand towel that has been retired from household service. I keep a whole pile of old towels, of various sizes, in my shop to work on as well as for cleaning. They are also nice when you need to work on something that you care about the finish on like firearms or to prevent scratching your acrylic panels.
     
  7. Kanedias

    Kanedias Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    124
    I saw Olivia working on the sub assemblies on a serving tray (tea tray) which is a good idea to stop small screws rolling away and getting lost.
     
  8. K3LAG

    K3LAG Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2015
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    21
    I personally don't care for using a tray. I find the sides get in my way and if I accidentally hit the edge of the tray things go flying. I find the towel trick more effective for me.

    The only thing worse than chasing screws and nuts is chasing springs. I hate it when I let a spring fly and the first sound I hear is when it hits something clear across the room. Of course, neither the towel or tray will help with that.
     
    Henry feldman likes this.
  9. Colin

    Colin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    20
    I used a large blanket on a large table, it has to be solid, anything with a weave that screws can fall through would be useless. Lights also help.
     
  10. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    758
    Likes Received:
    112
    You can get a 6 foot folding tabel from Walmart for around 40 bucks, they fold away nicely when not needed.

    I have two and work great when tinkering in my shop. They are not going to hold the weight of saw horses of coarse but more then sturdy enough to build a printer on.
     
  11. richgain

    richgain Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    33
    Take great care removing the X motor screws from an assembled printer - the motor is heavy and will suddenly fall off the X carriage onto the glass build plate. Fortunately, mine didn't break!
     
  12. Henry feldman

    Henry feldman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Messages:
    969
    Likes Received:
    389
    yikes... Thanks for the warning. Hopefully that glass plate stays intact, given that it's role is to heat up and cool down frequently.
     
  13. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2014
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    89
    Broke a pane on my rep2 this way. Totally sucks
     
  14. theTroll527

    theTroll527 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2015
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    17
    Is there a way to add a safety strap to keep it from falling? I think I will be investigating that on my build.

    j.
     
  15. Large

    Large Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    7
    Or perhaps a styrofoam board to be placed on the bed during assembly/dissassembly.
     
  16. mike01hu

    mike01hu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2014
    Messages:
    957
    Likes Received:
    166
    Can't you leave the bed off until the main assembly is finished? After that I would take care to remove the plate before major work.
     
  17. Colin

    Colin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    20
    The glass is removable, the bed can be brought down low, you can put protective material over it. Tension should always be removed from a belt before removing the motor and there is no reason to remove the motor once it has been attached. This will not be an issue anyone should expect to run into, it sounds like Rich was disassembling for some reason.
     
  18. richgain

    richgain Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    33
    Correct! But I was careless, hence my advice to take care IF you should need to remove the motor.
    I was having real trouble feeding filament into the hot end. It would get one or two cms in and then stick, which led to the hobbed wheel stripping the filament. The most useful change I made was to carefully chamfer the inside of the PTFE liner, creating a funnel for the filament to feed into.
    I also reseated the square nut for the filament idler spring-loaded bolt since it was riding too high, increasing the pressure too much.
    It is undoubtedly better than it was but I have to say that I do still find changing the filament is far more difficult on the BigBox than on my Mendel90. Does anyone have any good tips for how to load the filament?
     
  19. Steven Burns

    Steven Burns Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    195
    Likes Received:
    55
    What a great idea for the PTFE tubing. I was having a heck of a time with it.

    I would also like to see a longer arm for the filament loader. Withe the difficulty in getting the filament to load, my fingers would hurt from such a short lever.
     
    Colin likes this.
  20. Henry feldman

    Henry feldman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Messages:
    969
    Likes Received:
    389
    Other items I would add so far:

    The Electronics Cover brackets are printed with the screw holes at "tap" tolerance rather than "clearance" tolerance. An appropriate sized metric drill bit allows the screws to spin freely (and be screwed in).

    For the heated bed nut-trap/corner-top assembly, as @PsyVision states above, you may need to scrape/cut the captive nut holes as they are lasered very tight and have some sprue in the holes. In addition, I found that if you first put the bolt through and tighten it down without the lock-washer in place giving you an extra 1mm of thread, you can tighten the nut into place without stripping. This compressed the little bits of sprue left after scraping and cutting. (note to E3D staff, I haven't finished the printer, but is there a compelling reason these had to be 18mm screws not 20mm? Because the tolerances here just lend themselves to stripping those nuts!)

    Put down a light colored towel and have very good lighting. Everything is black on black parts! And by the way again to the E3D staff, is there some reason we had to mix multiple lengths of all black M3 screws inside the same bag?? Anyway if you have small ziplock bags, you may want to presort these so you aren't constantly pouring screws out into your hand to find individual lengths...

    Lay all the black plastic parts out, as they aren't in any specific containers, so you are playing match-the-shape which is easier to do when they are all played out on your towel.
     

Share This Page