cleaning nozzle surface from PLA

Discussion in 'E3D-v6 and Lite6' started by goldiee36, Jan 27, 2016.

  1. goldiee36

    goldiee36 Member

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    Hi all,

    what is the best way to clean the outside of the nozzle from the melted PLA? The best would be without disassembling the extruder/hotend.
    Is there any chemical I can use (like aceton in case of ABS) or just heating up the hotend and using some piece of cloth? Heat gun? (If so, how?)

    Thanks and apologies if it is already been asked. (I found nothing conclusive..)

    Adam
     
  2. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

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    Hi Adam,
    My pocedure is:
    Heat it up to the working temperature, carefully peel off the major parts with an old carving knife.
    If necessary, use a small brass push (like they are used for mini-tools like Proxxon, Dremel etc.) to wipe off the rest.

    Don't overdo it - it will collect plastic immediately again.

    Where does that come from?
    In my case mainly the odd thin spiderweb fathoms left during fast moves, blown to the heater by the parts cooling fan.

    No force, no chemicals, but patience and diligence, in short: TLC. - Like in the real life... ;)

    HTH

    Cheers,
    Ulli
     
  3. mike01hu

    mike01hu Well-Known Member

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    Ulli is right. I heat the nozzle to about 5 degrees above print temperature, then wipe clean with kitchen paper towel. If you get lots of stringing in your prints, this will increase pickup, so look at your retraction settings and include z-lift for travel if not already implemented. Be wary of using abrasive methods as you do not want to change the nozzle profile. To be honest, I don't bother too much about small accumulations but I do watch out for possible blobbing from the accumulation as this can cause head crashes and print failure :-(

    Mike
     
  4. goldiee36

    goldiee36 Member

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    Hi!

    Thanks for the answers! It went easier then I thought. Heating up + kitchen paper towel did the trick.

    A print stopped in the middle (my laptop lost the USB connection somehow) and after I removed the printed object a big blob remained on the nozzle.

    Thanks again and have a nice day! :)
     
  5. elmoret

    elmoret Administrator

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    It is worth noting that if you use a brass brush with the hotend's heater on, you run the risk of shorting the MOSFET on the board.
     
  6. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

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    If the isolation of the wires leading to the heater cartridge is insufficient and the wires are exposed, yes, the risk is given.

    Now, they should not be.

    Of course it is never advisable to work with metal tools in the vicinity of open voltage-conducting structural elements.

    Thanks for the caveat!

    Cheers,
    U.
     
  7. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

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    I had similar issues, I run almost exclusively of and SD card now unless it's small calibrations or something.

    After so long I have had repeater host use all of my memory (I have 6 gig) and freeze the computer.
     
  8. mike01hu

    mike01hu Well-Known Member

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    As @Miasmictruth says, it is much better to work from an SD card. I used to have problems with print stopping and this was due to Windows deciding that an update should be done, so I switched that feature(!?) off. That was not the total solution because the computer and printer are plugged into the same power ring/circuit that the fridge-freezer is and the compressor switching on/off induced spikes into the supply that disrupted the computer occasionally; interestingly, this does not affect the printer when SD printing i.e. better filtering by the printer power supply I suspect. If you don't have the SD card facility, turn off any auto-update and notification software that is likely to demand your computers attention while you are printing, also use a filtered power socket to minimise any power surges/spikes.
     

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