CNC Milling upgrade

Discussion in 'BigBox General Chat' started by JesperJuul, Nov 17, 2015.

  1. JesperJuul

    JesperJuul Well-Known Member

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    Hi Bigboxers

    I am Wunderding if the motionsystem on the big box is powerfull enough to be used for light CNC milling by making a mount for an Dremel 4000 or something like that?

    BR Jesper
     
  2. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

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    Hej, Jesper,

    what do you mean when you say "light milling"? Balsa wood? ABS sheets? Or?

    Generally, I would consider the whole setup as less suited ot move a milling drill around. The load on the belts - and in the first place the dust and dirt that flies everywhere - will have a non-positive influence on the life of the BigBox. There are enough designs dedicated to milling - and they are comparatively cheap.

    I would not consider to use the printer as a CNC mill, whereas using a simple lightweight 3 axes-milling machine could very well serve as a 3D printer.

    A different yet interesting concept is the use as a laser cutter - at least for the low energy 1 to 2 watts class of solid state lasers. Cutting paper, cardboard, even thin balsa wood and various plastic materials is possible. The german MAKE-magazine had some interesting articles on this this year.

    Cheers,
    U.
     
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  3. Falc.be

    Falc.be Well-Known Member

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    I already saw a comment once from the E3D guys that a laser module is high on their wishlist.

    I would welcome it for PCB's (with light sensitive layer that you can cure with the laser)
     
  4. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

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    One method for laser made pcbs is to spray paint a coper clad board, laser the paint off where you want to remove copper then dissolve the copper using traditional methods
     
  5. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

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    I would like to add that I have yet to personally do this, I have the materials I just need to design the board. However I have read of people doing this successful y
     
  6. Falc.be

    Falc.be Well-Known Member

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    Or just use the laser on a pcb with a photosensitive layer ?
     
  7. SoBaldrick

    SoBaldrick Well-Known Member

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    Got a Glowforge on order for that :)
     
  8. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

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    Pointing a 40 watts IR laser at a copper surface might end in some undesired yet foreseeable results. They claim a 1000 dpi resolution, that means, @ full power, 40 megawatts / square inch. The laser light will be partly reflected, partly scattered after the paint has been vaporized.

    [edit] OK, you won't get 40 watts of optical energy out of that tube. But the resulting remainder is still impressive. [/edit]

    Photoresist layers on pcbs usually are not sensitive to IR but rather to UV light.
     
  9. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

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    I can turn my lasers power down if I choose too, but its also enclosed and looses potency fairly quickly
     
  10. Falc.be

    Falc.be Well-Known Member

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    marketing opportunity :)
     
  11. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

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    Not sure if it will be accepted by the industry. Afaik, they use IR heaters to cure the photoresist varnish during production. OK, the marketing comedians will call it added value, pre-hardened. Like tested matches.

    Errr, the topic was CNC milling, wasn't it?

    But back once more to the "3D-Laser Printer" and marketing: I wonder how many people who spent a fortune on that mixed it up with a pretty fuzzy image of stereolithography machines that appear also under the labels (or do they call it hashtags today?) 3D, laser and such...

    Cheers,

    U.
     
  12. Ualdayan

    Ualdayan Member

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    I don't think you would want all that dust going around in your nearly $1k BigBox. Print this out, and buy the parts or the kit from the guy for $220 and make your own dedicated CNC that can be any size you want (mine has a cutting area of 16 inchs by 34 inches with vacuum tube attached). http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:724999

    Aside from the dust though - it should be possible. That one I linked and use myself is RAMPS/Arduino based, uses standard GCODE, and has a big beefy Dewalt attached despite only having 2 NEMA17s per axis. If all you are wanting to attach is a Dremel, you'll have to go pretty slow, but 1 motor per axis should be able to do it.
     
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  13. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

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    I know this is unrelated to big box, sorry. But what's your Z travel?
    How well is this able to hold up to the torque?
    What dewalt are you using, and finally do you have custom 3d parts to hold it in place?

    Thanks I was thinking about buying a cnc router or making one some day but this should do well untill I can afford something more robust.

    Ever think about adding a rotery axis?
     
  14. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    I'm running this as well. I have the DeWalt DWP611 for my spindle and bought a 1/8" Collet from elair. My X and Y are 24" in travel, with the total rod length being just under 36"

    My X is somewhere around 4" but that doesn't really matter because my longest tool bit is 22mm so I can't go much deeper than that on any given cut.
     
  15. Colin

    Colin Well-Known Member

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    I am planning on building this shortly, the Dewalt dw660 is suggested as an excellent tool, why is the 611 worth it for an extra $110? Can you cut steel and other mats?
     
  16. Henry feldman

    Henry feldman Well-Known Member

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    BTW: like on the X-Carve which uses the 611 (which can mill aluminum) I would advise getting the SuperPID mod to allow programmatic control over speed (requires 5 minutes of internal mod to the router)
     
  17. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    Basically more power never really hurt anything. I want to cut aluminum and maybe brass with it at some point. I have very little faith it can cut steel at any kind of speed.

    That said I do envision it being used to cut aluminum to make a CNC capable of cutting steel, at which point the 611 should have enough power to cut it.

    It's mostly a longevity and versatility reason.
     
  18. Colin

    Colin Well-Known Member

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    I appreciate your input and have decided to get the 611. I have been looking at the X-carve and that is a pretty reasonable price for what's included, it's only $1400 for the fully loaded option, which comes with a 611.
     
  19. Mike Kelly

    Mike Kelly Volunteer

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    If I could have afforded it, that's what I would have bought as well. Seems like a great design.
     
  20. Henry feldman

    Henry feldman Well-Known Member

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    BTW: if you look in the inventables forums we spend like 30-40% of the discussions dealing with flying stuff (dust, chips, etc) and how to manage them. Doing this inside the big box with all the fine parts and nooks and crannies would be horrific to clean. Also don't forget for milling you need a waste board since you will chew through your piece all the time.
     

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