E3D: enclosing the motion system

Discussion in 'Motion System' started by Jai Stanley, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. Jai Stanley

    Jai Stanley Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen,

    I have made a make-shift proof of concept enclosure that fully encloses the printer; but 'seals' against the back plane and leavbes the electronics enclosure open to the outside. Initial tests are very positive. The printer can slowly heat to 55/60 degrees making printing ABS very reliable.

    Having looked at the components, I can't see any that might have a reccomended MAX temperature anywhere near as low as this: but I would also like to heat the chamber to reach temperatures more suitable for polycarbonate (even higher if possible).

    My erason for fully enclosed is two-fold. To reduce energy required/increase efficiency/make it easier to heat and also to ensure the entire super-structure of the printer is heated slowly at the same time as all of the motion components. Rather than creating a temperature gradient over the aluminium sections/parts that could cause warping/deformation.

    Is this a valid approach? Have the tool-changer systems been tested/proven off to print in enclosures? Can you see issue with a fully enclosed aproach (other than hot end/motor/electronics cooling)? For instance, is there releif in the X axis machined spar that will allow slip when it expands? If not, I can see it putting stress on the linear rails of the Y axis.

    THank you for your time and I look forward to the discussion, and hopefully a reply from E3D.

    Kind regards,

    Jai
     
  2. Greg_The_Maker

    Greg_The_Maker Administrator
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    Hi,

    The machine was not intended to be used in a heated enclosure and as such we have not done any high temperature testing of the system.

    However from what I can remember I think most parts are rated to about 80C (this is not an official number from E3D).

    Just be careful about keeping the hotends cool, otherwise they will jam and watch out for binding due to thermal expansion, oh and check if the lubricants are good to that temperature too. We are using Magnalube on the rails.

    Keep us posted on how you get on :)
     
  3. Jai Stanley

    Jai Stanley Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for jumping in Greg. Don't worry: I realise only official releases from E3D are, well, official.

    So far, I've not had an issue with any jamming whatsoever. That's with ABS/PolyMax temperatures on the standard hot-ends; and with 320 degree polycarbonate temperatures on my hotter ends (they have copper blocks, titanium heat-brakes and nozzleX's - One V6, one Volcano).

    If I get any issues, I'll look into water-cooled hot-ends.

    You make a good point about luricants. The temperature affecting their performance doesn't concerm be at all (even if I got it to 150 degrees, which I never will!); what does is retension of the lubricant in the bearings. I need to check the viscosity at higher temperatures to make sure it isn't going to flow out. So far, again, its fine. At 63 degree camber air temp (measure at approx half the height of the tool-head wire above the printer) the grease on the linear rails is still solid.

    I do have concerns about the stepper motors though. They run extremely hot and the bearings in mine are clicking after only a few real world hours of printing. With the machine enclosed (back open) they run only a little warmer, so I don't think they've been cooked.. Need to get a battery for the IR thermometer. I think the current needs tweaking, the motors need cooling and the shafts need supporting. Anyway, that's for another discussion. I mention it as I think It's important for anyone wanting to enclose their machine to consider stepper cooling.
     
    mhe, Ntesla66 and Greg_The_Maker like this.

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