E3D v6/volcano, brass/copper PETG flow rate

Discussion in 'E3D-v6 and Lite6' started by MTJC, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. MTJC

    MTJC Member

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    Does anyone happen to know what the peak flow rates are for E3D v6/volcano with brass/copper combinations for PETG are by any chance? Also whether nozzle diameter has any limiting factor too?

    Many thanks.
     
  2. Ephemeris

    Ephemeris Well-Known Member

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    Good question! A table of maximum rates for different nozzle materials and sizes for the 30 and 40 watt heaters would be very interesting.

    I suppose you could do it yourself by issuing gcode commands to extrude say 200 mm. Do it at faster and faster extrusion speeds until the extruder stalls or strips.
     
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  3. elmoret

    elmoret Administrator

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    Too many factors to do a one size fits all table. Many types of PETG, many additives, many different extruder motor torques.

    A reasonable limit for Volcano for ABS/PLA/PETG is about 30mm^3/sec.

    Heater wattage doesn't affect extrusion rate unless you're having trouble maintaining temperature. Most of the heat is lost to atmosphere, not spent melting polymer.
     
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  4. MTJC

    MTJC Member

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    Thanks guys. I'm contemplating an upgrade from v6 to volcano as I'd like to print faster with PETG without compromising strength. With my current print speed flow rate (8 mm^3/s), I can touch the freshly laid plastic with my finger no problem. It's hot to the touch but not unbearable. Makes me think the layer bonding will be sub-optimal with regards to strength as a result.
     
  5. elmoret

    elmoret Administrator

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    This probably has more to do with the thermal conductivity of the polymer than the actual temperature. Our bodies are better heat flow indicators than they are temperature indicators - this is why a piece of metal feels cooler (or hotter, depending on the temperature) than a piece of wood of the same temperature.
     
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  6. MTJC

    MTJC Member

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    Excellent point elmoret. Thank you. Also, I've just realised it's ok to print PETG up to 265C. I've only dared up to 250C up till now so something to try/test further.
     

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