EDGE filament diameter

Discussion in 'Filament' started by Paul Winter, Jun 16, 2016.

  1. Paul Winter

    Paul Winter Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    My only two spools of EDGE that I have just nearly finished came in measured at 1.6mm (max), sometimes going down to 1.57mm over a couple of metres.

    When the filament arrived, I clipped samples from each spool (two different colours) to put in a folder for reference, and now that the spools are nearly empty, I did a check again. It looks like the filament is slightly on the skinny side compared to my ABS and PLA.

    It doesn't cause me any extruder jams i.e. no plastic seems to be going back up the cold end, even at higher temperatures, so I'm not particularly bothered about any extruder issues - two full reels with no jams is pretty good going.

    Has anyone else noticed if their EDGE filament appears thinner?

    Or do I replace my calipers? :rolleyes:
     
  2. R Design

    R Design Well-Known Member

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    When that happens do you change the filament diameter in the Slicer? Or mess around with extrusion multipliers?
     
  3. Paul Winter

    Paul Winter Well-Known Member

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    Funnily enough, both.
    I make a point of changing it in the slicer depending on what filament I am using at the time, I thought that was what is supposed to be done.
    However, for my sessions with EDGE I find I am also having to drop the extrusion multiplier - currently down to 0.9 in S3D, but still having to dial it back some more while the print is going on, depending on the job (some print operations cause massive filament accumulation on the nozzle).
    I have calibrated my extruder steps a couple of times since the printer was built, and after my move to a V6 hotend.

    I'm still on an EDGE learning curve :)
     
  4. mike01hu

    mike01hu Well-Known Member

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    What infill are you using, because the triangular pattern really causes more pickup due to crossing the same point three times with no Z-lift. I now use full honeycomb.
     
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  5. R Design

    R Design Well-Known Member

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    @mike01hu a good solution for problems (whether filament building up OR low layer tracks breaking) at infill-crossing-itself-points is to do thicker, less frequent infill layers using the S3d "sparse infill every X layers" feature.
     
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  6. Paul Winter

    Paul Winter Well-Known Member

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    Hello, Mike
    Thanks for the response :)
    I am using the rectilinear infill, but I am finding that on large areas of infill, I don't get a build up (or add to one I already have on the nozzle).
    I am keeping a close eye on perimeters and horizontal surfaces (lower 3 or 4 layers, intermediate surfaces, and top layers) however, as I find that this is when the build-up occurs.
    Observation is leading me to think that as the nozzle travels adjacent to, and in contact with, an existing run of laid-down filament, the side of the nozzle is picking up the build-up. This is even more noticeable when doing perimeters, and walls of say 2mm-3mm width.
    So as the inner and outer perimeter walls are laid down with a gap between them, the next infill pass rattles/bounces the nozzle from side to side down the length of the wall to build the top of the wall level with the perimeters.
    Imagine trying to fill a U-shaped channel - that's when my (and everyone else's?) problem with blobbing is at it's worst.
    Towards the middle of a pass like this, it looks like the nozzle is in the middle of a moving puddle of filament.
    If the puddle/blob doesn't get deposited on the perimeter, the next time the nozzle departs the wall to a different area, it causes stringing (really fine like cobwebs) and the blob on the nozzle decreases in size, often until the nozzle is nearly clean.

    Don't get me wrong, I have had more successful prints with a spool of EDGE than I ever did with ABS, and as long as I keep an eye on the progress and remove the blob as it gets deposited, the prints are coming out great.

    I'm running my EDGE at 0.2mm, bed 80, hotend 225 on a V6 with no cooling at the nozzle.
     

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    #6 Paul Winter, Jun 17, 2016
    Last edited: May 8, 2017
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  7. Paul Winter

    Paul Winter Well-Known Member

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    "Don't get me wrong, I have had more successful prints with a spool of EDGE than I ever did with ABS"

    That's a minor problem in itself, as I am spending more time printing and watching the hotend than doing other things! :)

    At the moment, I'm concentrating on getting a couple of projects completed and out of the way prior to doing a series of deliberately broken EDGE prints to see what the results of reducing the flow even more, reducing the hotend temperature and so on will accomplish.

    Many thanks for the feedback :)
     
  8. Chase.Wichert

    Chase.Wichert Well-Known Member

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    I had the same problem with Edge, not sure. I believe it needs cooling, but not sure that would help with this problem.
     
  9. Henry feldman

    Henry feldman Well-Known Member

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    I did this Mike after your suggestion and while it did print beautifully the print time became insanely long...
     
  10. Chase.Wichert

    Chase.Wichert Well-Known Member

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    What's wrong with fast honeycomb? I use that a lot and it works well
     
  11. mike01hu

    mike01hu Well-Known Member

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    It's a weaker infill as it does not fully fill the honeycomb structure but does it over two layers, leaving gaps and less inter-layer adhesion. I need a reliable infill for stiffness and lightness.
     
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  12. Chase.Wichert

    Chase.Wichert Well-Known Member

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    Okay so application dependent really, my stuff doesn't require the extra stiffness, well most of it.
     
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  13. gearmesh

    gearmesh Well-Known Member

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    My EDGE as well has a lot of variances throughout the roll. May be why printing is a challenge sometimes.

    Although with that said, my latest EDGE prints are pretty nice!
     
  14. mike01hu

    mike01hu Well-Known Member

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    1.75 down to 1.6; that's an 8.5% reduction and would really screw up the feed rate. I'll check when I get back from holiday as E3D claim a much closer tolerance. But, like @gearmesh says, I get good results.
     
  15. GeckoBox3D

    GeckoBox3D Well-Known Member

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    If I got a spool of filament that came in at tolerances other than the advertised +/- 0.05mm I would return it. The main reason we buy premium filament is for reliable material that prints the same the entire way through the spool. I've recently started buying colorfabb filaments and I'm amazed at the consistency right the way through the role. 5 roles of filament and they are all 1.75mm, +/- 0.01mm. They are also cheaper.... £33 for a roll of edge, £30 for Colorfabb pla and nGen (£24 if you have a 3Dhubs 20% discount). Delivery is also cheaper, and free if you order enough.

    Saying that though, check your calipers... Buy a calibration set, or measure something of known diameter. If this isn't possible, measure something and re-measure it every so often to ensure your calipers are not losing accuracy. I do this on a piece of v-slot aluminium extrusion of known diameter (20mm, i think the tolerance is pretty tight on it as well)

    EDIT: The advertised tolerance of Colorfabb is +/- 0.05mm, but according to their website accuracy is checked with a laser, hence the better than advertised tolerances I guess
     

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