Favorite 3d Scanners?

Discussion in 'General' started by Miasmictruth, Dec 15, 2016.

  1. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering what everyone favorite 3d scanners were. I want to scan some mediumish components for a car and print them with my big box, so looking for suggestions and advice. Thanks :)

    The parts I want to scan would fit inside the volume of a standard 3d printer.
     
  2. Kanedias

    Kanedias Well-Known Member

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    I've used the next engine, sense scanner and photogrammetry and none of those are any use for accurately reproducing an existing part.

    Sadly I can't get hold of an artec spider or mantis f5 which should be more accurate. Even then you aren't going to end up with a file you can easily manipulate I think.

    With careful measurement and fusion 360 there shouldn't be too much you couldn't reproduce from scratch.
     
  3. Henry feldman

    Henry feldman Well-Known Member

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    My favorite scanner is a really high end scanner that comes with a dude who knows how to use it. I have never found any of the cheap ones to give you more than a general shape with poor detail. Now it might be useful as a template to measure against, but the geometry is poor.
     
  4. Tom De Bie

    Tom De Bie Well-Known Member

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    I'm looking into the Ciclop 3D scanner at the moment. I like it because it's Open Source ;)
     
  5. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

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    The David Scanner also started as OpenSource, with tons of user experience pumped into it. Last week I saw that now it is an HP product. At a matching price level.
    Recently, on a trip to Bacelona, I discovered a "3D Studio" shop. The guy there ran it like your traditional family photographer's studio, the product now is coloured 3D prints (the mineral variety). He has a room sized scanner chamber, equipped with 20+ SLR cameras and several pattern projectors, all are fired synchronously to get full coverage of any object in it. No information on the achieved resolution and accuracy.

    Specifying those parameters will make the selection easier. The result, also as a function of the budget, may be null. Then making use of a commercial scanning service might make sense. Or tweak the specifications.

    All Kinect and Xtion based devices are more like delivering something like 'there is something, maybe'.

    An interesting approach can be found in the contributions of Phil Nolan on youtube. Click your way there.

    Cheers,
    U.
     
  6. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

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    Did anybody ever think of using the Bigbox itself as a 3D-scanner? At least 2.5D? Lots of z movement in the first approach, but hey, is there a law that forbids to switch axes to avoid too many elevator trips? A simple (or not so simple) touch probe would be everything that's needed. And some lines of code...

    Cheers,
    U.
     
  7. Henry feldman

    Henry feldman Well-Known Member

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    I have a ciclops, and it's OK. I mean nothing special quality wise compared to professional scans, but good enough to use for dimensioning a CAD drawing.

    If you just are scanning a few things then just have a professional do it. They will give you a way higher quality and accuracy. Reflective metallic parts also are really hard to scan (as are totally black objects) which many auto parts are one or the other.
     
  8. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

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    In artists' shops you can get a dulling spray which does what it is called. Chalk or something in a solidifying medium. You can wipe that away afterwards.
     
  9. Tom De Bie

    Tom De Bie Well-Known Member

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    I just like to build things and after several 3D printers a 3D scanner looked interesting ;)
     
  10. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

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  11. Henry feldman

    Henry feldman Well-Known Member

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    Totally understand, and I built one too. Just haven't found it particularly useful due to the low res.
     
  12. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

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    Basically mocking up a mounting adapter the hoping to scan and print it, the resolution may not be a big issue if I can get the right dimensions
     
  13. Dr Jeep

    Dr Jeep Well-Known Member

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    Unless it's something of a horrendously complicated form you are better off biting the bullet and drawing it, you'll end up with something which can be adapted and modified easier even if the 3D scan was perfect.

    Also most of the low end 3D scanners are ok for doing surface modelling, but as soon as there is a massive deviation in the surface...like a sunk bolt/screw hole it all starts getting pretty messy.

    Have a look at

    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:526373
    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:672935

    Both of these were incredibly simple to do in ACAD123/Fusion and made out of primitives with just calliper measurements from the original. I doubt I spent more than an hour and a half on either (and you'd spend much more trying to convince a 3D scanner to play ball on those sorts of objects)

    What sort of parts are you trying to make ?
     
  14. WestReak

    WestReak Member

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    I use artec eva. It's handheld, so there's no problems with positioning objects i wanna scan. Though it took long time before i learned how to scan.
    Good for middle and big objects, not so good for small. I't possible to scan small ones, but it's really difficult.
     
  15. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

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    Basically trying to replace some broken plastic tabs. There are screw holes for replacement tabs but they don't actually make them its something that comes up frequently and frequently different. It technically for a friend of mine that I am helping with 3d printing.

    If it comes down to modeling it for every new geometry then so be it but we are hoping to work around some of that.
     
  16. Henry feldman

    Henry feldman Well-Known Member

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    If there are screw holes, and tabs, that sounds like high precision stuff that's fairly small. I'd bet it's faster to model them from scratch than scan, correct the model, clean the screw holes, etc.
     
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  17. Kanedias

    Kanedias Well-Known Member

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  18. Miasmictruth

    Miasmictruth Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, that's is my typical go to :) love fusion360
     

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