heat break loose in heatsink

Discussion in 'E3D-v6 and Lite6' started by R Design, Mar 5, 2016.

  1. R Design

    R Design Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    183
    v6 hotend

    The heat break wobbles a bit in the heat sink.

    Is that normal?

    (I added a modest amount of thermal compound before mating them.)
     
  2. elmoret

    elmoret Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2014
    Messages:
    586
    Likes Received:
    91
    Not normal, means it hasn't been tightened sufficiently.
     
  3. UlrichKliegis

    UlrichKliegis Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    47
    It should sit pretty fixed in the heat sink. The other end gets tight only when you press the nozzle against the heat break. But c a r e f u l l y !!!
     
    Mike Kelly likes this.
  4. Trip Ives

    Trip Ives New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    This is my experimental fix (see image) which worked very well. Yes, this is a very small allen wrench stuck between the hot end and the heat sink. It allows for complete tightening of the hot end (thus preventing wobbling) while not having it pressed directly against the hink sink (which would prevent the hot end from heating).

    I'm going to run to Home Depot now and see what I can pick-up as a more permanent solution.


    ... My final solution was a coil made from a think paper clip. :)

    20170603_134704.jpg
     
    #4 Trip Ives, Jun 3, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2017
  5. Kanedias

    Kanedias Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    124
    That is not put together right - there should be a gap between the heatsink and the heater block. The nozzle should also be more or less fully screwed in. that cooling arrangement isn't the one that came with it I assume?
     
  6. Ephemeris

    Ephemeris Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    182
    I have to say I have had problems with the heat break coming loose. I've talked to others who have had the same issue. The lack of a positive lock between the two is flaw as far as I'm concerned. I have found it annoying enough that I've started using high temperature "red" loctite to attach the heat break semi permanently. It's slightly inconvenient in the event of a hard to clear filament jam, but for me it's totally worth it.

    (Yes I said RED loctite)
    (Yes I know I've increased the thermal resistance slightly between the heatbreak and heatsink)
     
    Paul Winter likes this.
  7. Paul Winter

    Paul Winter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2016
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    9
    What would help in situations like this would be some way of really holding the heat-block, while it's at 200C, that doesn't involve a dirty great shifting spanner, Mole grips, or anything likely to cause damage to the thermistor, the heater cartridge, or their wiring.
    I have often thought about drilling a hole through the heat-block somewhere (obviously aiming to miss the aforesaid thermistor and heater cartridge), with the aim of using a stainless steel rod inserted into the hole to give me something to hold the heater-block steady while I torsion down the nozzle
     
  8. Paul Winter

    Paul Winter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2016
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    9
    Run the heat-break into the heatsink with thermal paste, until it is nearly seated, then clean off the excess thermal paste on the last few threads, before applying red Loctite and screwing the heat-break finally into it's seating?
     
    Ephemeris likes this.
  9. Ephemeris

    Ephemeris Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    182
    I might try that on the next one I do! Be a bit fiddly but it's worth a try.

    By the way, regular red Loctite (Red 271) probably can't take heatbreak temperatures. Instead use high temperature Red Loctite 272. It's good up to 450 degrees F (232 C). It's a bit expensive and the shelf life is not real long once opened. A cheaper equivalent is Permatex 27200.
     
    Paul Winter likes this.

Share This Page