Howto destroy a borosilicate glass bed

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by Nibbels, Feb 9, 2020.

  1. Nibbels

    Nibbels Well-Known Member

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    Actually I thought I had the effect under control and was on the safe side with PETG. That's because my other printers had glass beds, too.
    I never had any problems with PETG.

    My experinence is that ASA and some nylon destroy the ceramic glass ( ceranglas (R) ) completely if larger areas are printed at once.

    Now I know that the TC glass bed also seems vulnerable to PETG.

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    The Esun red did not stick as much I guess. But the Amazon Basics white sticks so good that it ripped off the glass.
    I did not have to use a tool to remove the part. Just one finger. Crack..

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    I used 90°C bed temperature. The first layer was close to overextrusion because the z-offset is set tight.

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    I will now check if that might have been a bad batch of glass.
    And then probably move to pertinax or a carbon plate as I did earlier when I moved away from the black ceramic glass.

    Screenshot_9.jpg
     
  2. Paul Meyer

    Paul Meyer Well-Known Member

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    Been there, done that. I haven't destroyed my TC bed yet, but I ripped a good chunk out of a Rostock v2 bed once upon a time.

    I've got flex metal PEI plates on order, I'll switch to those as soon as a have an option. I'm so done with glue/tape/glass/spray.

    The Prusa i3-Mk3 flexible bed (powercoated or PEI) sheet just makes life so much simpler. Everything seems to stick, generally pops off, and if not you can pull off the bed, flex it a bit, and allow the part to peel off a bit at a time without the massive suction involved with prying a large part off a glass bed.

    I'm working to see if I can reproduce that with the TC.
     
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  3. dc42

    dc42 Well-Known Member

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    I don't use borosilicate glass on my other 3D printers. Ordinary 4mm float glass is just fine if there is a heat spreader between the bed heater and the glass. If a print sticks to the glass too well even after cooling to room temperature, putting the bed+print in the freezer usually releases it.
     
  4. Nibbels

    Nibbels Well-Known Member

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    Thanky for your reply.

    I really loved glass for flexibles. A friend uses normal window glass. He lives next to a glassmaker. As you said, he as well uses spacers under the glas at all edges. So there is a bit air between the heated plate and the window glass.
    The ceramic glass was way to expensive within my old printer. It was glued into the printer and 140€ to replace.
    The good thing in the TC is that I can change the glas on the fly.

    That PETG would destroy it shocked me a bit.
     
  5. John Meacham

    John Meacham Well-Known Member

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    I am using a gorilla glass cover for a surface pro 4 which is just about the right size over my borosilicate bed. It seems to do the job well for PETG but is too slick for PLA. I ordered some dimafix so will be experimenting with it. It wolud be nice to not have to flip my bed to the gorilla side and back when switching between PLA and PETG.
     
  6. Russell

    Russell Member

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    I am doing the exact same! Except I went for the Surface Pro 6/7 tempered glass one, as the cutouts for the speakers etc were much smaller.

    Inspiration came from this youtube vid:



    It seems to work well for PLA, but im having trouble with the PETG. What are your temps John?
    Granted, ive never used PETG before, so it might not be the surface issue and something else.
    When first layer goes well, the whole thing goes well. But thats when the first layer is a simple solid. When the first layer has small circles and square bits, it messes up and sticks to the nozzle.

    But on the plus side, during a simpler print, one time it even came off the bed as I knocked it, and I could just push it back on, like a suction cup.
     
  7. Joe Pomo

    Joe Pomo Well-Known Member

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    I want to do this for my TC bed as well...

    As a test run, I did this with the 3mm thick aluminum buildplate from an Intamsys HT printer + powder-coated PEI sheet from MatterHackers.
    - Had our machine shop mill 54 holes (6.5 diameter, 2mm depth) into the topside
    - Used these magnets due to their long-term high-temp capability: https://www.magnet4sale.com/smco-magnets-dia-1-2x1-16-samarium-cobalt-magnets-608-f-temperature/
    - Used Red RTV adhesive to glue the magnets: https://www.amazon.com/Permatex-81409-High-Temp-Silicone-Gasket/dp/B000HBIB80

    So far it is working well.

    For the TC, TH3D appears to supply smooth or powder-coated PEI sheets in sizes which could be sheared-down to fit the TC bed:
    https://www.th3dstudio.com/product/ezflex2-flexible-print-system/
     

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    #7 Joe Pomo, Mar 14, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
  8. Joe Pomo

    Joe Pomo Well-Known Member

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