My First Benchy advice please

Discussion in 'Calibration, Help, and Troubleshooting' started by jamiehibbard, May 22, 2016.

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  1. jamiehibbard

    jamiehibbard Member

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    So I finished building the printer yesterday :) The Dual one

    I have a few wrong/miss printed parts that I will sort out later with e3d but nothing that should effect the printting I think.

    I am happy with this, but just don't know how to improve it. It was mainly the back bottom of the boat and the doorway that I would like advice on.
    IMG_20160522_115210.jpg IMG_20160522_115147.jpg
     
  2. Stefan

    Stefan Well-Known Member

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    hmm what material and temp did you print?
    To me, not so much XP yet, the top layers on the door look really "flüssig"... liquid?
    like the temp was to high.
     
  3. jamiehibbard

    jamiehibbard Member

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    Hi, I followed the guide here http://wiki.e3d-online.com/wiki/Your_First_Print and used the PLA everday in the box.

    My frist attempted did not stick to the plate so I upped the heated bed from 50 to 70 and this worked fine. The Extruder was at 210 as per instructions. and seemed to print fine for the most part.

    Wondering if it is the level of the bed or is it something else. Is there a guide to dubug the benchy?
     
  4. Pierce

    Pierce Well-Known Member

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    It looks really good!

    Have a look at this handy guide for how to make improvements: https://www.simplify3d.com/support/print-quality-troubleshooting/ you dont need simplify3d the advice works for any slicer!

    For the hairs you need to play around with retraction more than likely, also you could try and print colder, my default PLA temp is 190C, but E3D and a few other supplies like their filament hotter. Experiment in 5C increments and see what works for you.
     
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  5. GeoffS

    GeoffS Member

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    I've printed a few benchys recently with varying degrees of success (old filament is to blame I think)
    I followed the advice in this video

    to print a 100mm tower at varying temperatures. Now I know just what temperatures my various PLA filaments like.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. jamiehibbard

    jamiehibbard Member

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    So I have gone back and printed a few more of these, and done the other things suggested. So thanks.

    I have worked out that the bad bit at the rear side of the benchy is where the print is started. I still can't seem to get rid of this bad line on the hull of the boat.

    Any ideas? It's near perfect now
     
  7. Spoon Unit

    Spoon Unit Well-Known Member

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    You can't completely remove the line, though you can disperse it around the boat instead of having it all together. It's a result of the the fact that, physically, the print head must start and end the outline in some place. By collecting those start/end points together, this "seam" can be positioned whereever we like with trespect to the model. Two alternatives exist (within S3D at least). One is to randomise layer start points, which results in what some people call "zits". The other is to optimise layer points for print speed, which will be a hard to predict, but will be a function of the model design. Use S3D to show retractions and you should get a feel for where the start/end points will appear on the outline. No matter how hard you try though, you won't remove this sort of effect from printing alone; at least not with FFF. Post printing processing may help, either through sanding or painting, coating (XTC3D for PLA) or acetone vapour bathing (for ABS). Alternatively, you could upgrade to an SLA/SLS type printer if you really need to remove the seam entirely :)
     
    #7 Spoon Unit, May 29, 2016
    Last edited: May 29, 2016
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  8. orcinus

    orcinus Well-Known Member

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    KISSlicer has an option that starts and ends layers a bit ”inside” the perimeter, thus eliminating the bulk of the blobbing on layer start. That + jitter + the ability to manually tune the side where layers start can virtually eliminate (hide) the seam and the ”zits”.
     

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