Silicone brush nozzle cleaner

Discussion in 'Tool heads & ToolChanger' started by blarbles, Aug 25, 2019.

  1. blarbles

    blarbles Well-Known Member

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    I have found I don't need the paper clip with my silicone brush setup.
     
  2. Spoon Unit

    Spoon Unit Well-Known Member

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    Snap. I printed the frog - 177 tool changes - without touching the machine and had only the final strand snagged in the brush at the end. The rest of the snagged strands had been removed by the motion of the head during the purge/prime routines themselves; i.e. fast physical motion near the snagged filament knocking it clear.
     
  3. Paul Arden

    Paul Arden Well-Known Member

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    This is mine, though not sure it is very effective. Definitely don’t have my prime and wipe dialed in yet.
     

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  4. Paul Arden

    Paul Arden Well-Known Member

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    @Spoon Unit is that with the routine you posted earlier?
     
  5. Spoon Unit

    Spoon Unit Well-Known Member

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  6. Kenneth Albanowski

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    Heh, yeah, I chopped off the end rings exactly like that just after I posted my photos.

    For folks who haven't tried it, the default purge routines park over those holes, extrude some filament, wait a moment for it to cool, then brush the nozzle. The paperclip makes a little bridge that helps knock/snip the solidified filament off the tip while it is over the hole, and in theory lets it fall right down. You can see the paperclip in one of the pictures of Greg's smart brush. In practice, eventually some bit of filament just drapes over the ring around the hole, and now you have a clog of them building up.

    I tried this a while ago with 'the whole Sanjay', a shop vac. (Sorry if that was someone else's idea, I just remember Sanjay in videos talking about it, probably with Tom.) That actually worked quite well, (on a different, much smaller printer) although the vac hose inevitably clogged, and the filament in the vac hopper just stays a large whispy cloud, it never compacts down. Those long drips are not the easiest material to handle.

    You can see a video of that here, and a description of the whole thing (which involved a Palette and a heavily modified printer running a Duet board) at the end of the page here. Hopefully I can get a perfect Gustav with my TC...

    Looks like the spools on the inside would interfere with getting a hose in there, you'd have to either move them out, or drill a hole in a side-panel.

    Spoon, I'll probably try out the silicone brush, but I'm wondering about purge buckets and wipers now, like the BCN3D. That shouldn't involve long wisps, and I'll bet the drippings into the buckets are actually more compact.
     
  7. Spoon Unit

    Spoon Unit Well-Known Member

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    Indeed. I played with it for quite a while but just chopped them off as a quick fix. I haven't reprinted them since showing them the snippers, but I really like the simple double-height brush someone showed, so I might do a second print to generate a larger piece to give both heights as the volcanoes are going to get mounted sooner or later. Printing as one piece would avoid the weakness of attaching only one one side, but someone somewhere had the bright idea of using some PETG as a support material for PLA and that would work really well in that case. I've already experienced how they stick during a print, but are happy to detach later.

    I've moved the spools to the front and after a couple more iterations think I have nailed stopping them unspooling or moving. That means they're no longer being dripped on by either hot filament or strands. My 'bucket' is just a big plate that catches the strands when they get thrown off. It's not elegant but it works. It doesn't catch everything though so I really need a good vacuum in there already to pull all the tiny bits that get everywhere, and everywhere underneath thanks to those lovely holes in the base. As pretty as they make it, they're ripe for filling. I honestly think that the silicone brush will do, if we can generate the right set of movements to increase the success rate of detaching the caught strands. It's such a simple solution overall, and has the nice end result of keeping the silicone sock and the hot end really clean. In any case, it's cheap to try out.
     
  8. Greg Holloway

    Greg Holloway Administrator
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    It's not publically accessible, and there is no paper clip in there either anyway.
     
  9. Andy Cohen

    Andy Cohen Well-Known Member

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    I was walking through a Bed Bath and Beyond this morning and just happen to see the silicon brushes for sale. 2 for $10! Rated to 260C
    I may experiment with the brush wipe too as well as the bungee cord... the thing with the bungee cord though is the way it works eliminates the time needed to move over to the brush and do a bunch of stuff. All that purging and wiping and traveling per tool change adds to the print time... quite a bit. Another benefit is the drop zone. With the bungee strung across the parked area the strands all fall towards the back of the machine and away from the internally mounted spools. I'm thinking about designing a tray that would catch most if not all.... hmmm the bungee could be strung from the tray and the tray could also have a piece of silicon brush as well for a double wipe.... hmmm...
     
    #29 Andy Cohen, Sep 28, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2019

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