Solvent weld struts?

Discussion in 'BigBox General Chat' started by W1EBR.Gene, Aug 10, 2016.

  1. W1EBR.Gene

    W1EBR.Gene Well-Known Member

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    What do people think about the idea of solvent welding the struts to the bottom z-axis bed? I have both a pure solvent (Weld On 4) and an acrylic cement (Weld On 16) that flows (like maple syrup).

    Gene
     
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  2. mike01hu

    mike01hu Well-Known Member

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    Quite a lot of the BigBox could be glued including the struts and the bed.
     
  3. R Design

    R Design Well-Known Member

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    For most applications the thicker solvent is a better bet because it "fills in" gaps.

    My experience with the bed is that it takes a while to settle down and find the optimal position of all the components. In other words it needs tightening more than once with some time in between.
     
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  4. W1EBR.Gene

    W1EBR.Gene Well-Known Member

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    I wound up making a mix of both solvents so that it would both wick and flow as well as fill minor cracks. You want to make sure that the parts are aligned with the top half before doing this :).
     
  5. Ephemeris

    Ephemeris Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I would not do it. If you need to do certain repairs you may paint yourself into a corner with no way out. Extreme example (which I assume you would not think of) would be to glue the bottom on. You would be in so much trouble later...

    If you want to tighten things up a little (not as much as gluing would do) and increase durability, put flat washers under every bolt head that goes through acrylic. Use fender washers when they fit for even more clamping area.
     
  6. W1EBR.Gene

    W1EBR.Gene Well-Known Member

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    I agree that you have to be very judicious about which seams are bonded together! I would also advise anyone thinking of doing this to think about whether the parts will ever need to be disassembled or if the parts are supposed to move, even slightly (for example, the z-axis bearing clamps).

    On the positive side, for seams that do not need to come apart, it does provide rigidity without tightening the screw/trap nuts together so tightly that the acrylic could deform or break.

    Since this is still a work-in-progress for me, I am not suggesting that people try this unless they have a lot of building experience and are willing to live with any mistakes they might make.

    Gene
     

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