Standby feature for the BigBox?

Discussion in 'BigBox General Chat' started by Tetrikus, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. Tetrikus

    Tetrikus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    12
    I wonder, if there is a standby state for the BigBox. When I power it on with the main Switch, the Fan goes on and it keeps running until I switch the main power switch back off. This makes sense, since it is on the 12V+/-. The main power switch is quite hart to reach anyway, since it is about the middle of the rear side. I’d like to power on the printer itself all day long (at some days) - is there something like a standby feature - or are there any ideas how I could add something like it?

    I'd like to have a state where I can reach OctoPi but in which the printer doesn't make any noise. Am I the only one? :)
     
  2. Rob Heinzonly

    Rob Heinzonly Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2015
    Messages:
    362
    Likes Received:
    125
    No, you are not the only one. I'm planning to install an extra power switch at the front of the BigBox. Another 'adjustment' will be controlling the case fan with an Arduino. As far as I know, there is no standby function in Marlin.
     
  3. Alex9779

    Alex9779 Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    2,405
    Likes Received:
    731
    You are not the only one...
    There is no option without hacking to power down the RUMBA and so the fan above the RUMBA will run always. The fan in the back will run even when being able to power down the RUMBA because it is connected to the PSU.
    On G+ Jos van der Plas showed what he did: https://plus.google.com/108544040813066360014/posts/6Pr664v8wk5
    He added a second power supply IN the box to power the Pi and a relay to cut power to the RUMBA I think. That is very nice because it is all bundled but still the back case fan will run if you don't put that on the relay too.
    Then you can configure your Pi to control that relay and switch the power on and off.

    I went for a more simple solution.
    I didn't connect my Pi to the power converter supplied but used an external plug power supply. One that you normally use for powering Pis.
    I pulled that cable through the USB port.
    Then I used 433MHz plugs and a transmitter connected to the Pi. The 433MHz plug only powers the main PSU, the Pi is powered elsewhere.
    With two little installs on the Pi you can control the 433MHz plug and switch it on and off.
    That way I am powering the machine up and down from OctoPrint. The Pi is always on.

    Here are some pics:
    IMG_0235.JPG IMG_0236.JPG IMG_0237.JPG IMG_0238.JPG
     
  4. Tetrikus

    Tetrikus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    12
    I like the idea to let the Raspberry Pi always run (since it is working as a server). I'm wondering, if I really need an additional Arduino to control the two fans (for the electronics and the main fan in the back) as @Rob Heinzonly mentioned. The GPIO pins from the Pi are not used right now, so I guess, the Pi could also manage the fans directly. I think, it's worth to think a little bit further then. Thanks for the inspiration! :)
     
    #4 Tetrikus, Mar 21, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2016
    Rob Heinzonly likes this.
  5. Alex9779

    Alex9779 Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2015
    Messages:
    2,405
    Likes Received:
    731
    I just can recommend my solution regarding price, simplicity of installation and usage.
    A plug power supply for a Pi is around 7€.
    I ordered these plugs: http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B00KM83Q1U?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00
    This transmitters: http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B00R2U8OEU?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00
    Cables: http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B00OL6JZ3C?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00
    And additional antennas: http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B00SO651VU?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00

    The antennas are only if you want to extend range, you have to solder yourself. It worked without very good. I tried it without because they came from China and took 4 weeks I think.

    Here is the post how to set the whole thing up on a RasPi: https://kabelfrettchen.de/raspberry-pi-funksteckdosen-steuern/
    Sorry it's in german.

    Then you can add system commands to OctoPrint config:
    Code:
    system:
      actions:
      [...]
      - action: printer on
        async: false
        command: sudo send 01010 1 1
        ignore: false
        name: Turn on the printer
      - action: printer off
        async: false
        command: sudo send 01010 1 0
        confirm: You are about to switch off the power of your printer!
        ignore: false
        name: Turn off the printer
     
  6. Rob Heinzonly

    Rob Heinzonly Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2015
    Messages:
    362
    Likes Received:
    125
    @Tetrikus : I will be using the Arduino to do the following: at start-up of the printer I run the case fan at 10% or so and measure the outlet temperature with an DS18B20. I will regulate the speed of the fan by PWM. When the temperature starts to rise, I will raise the fan speed (using PID I think). I already have an Arduino Nano in my printer that is powering a ringled under the heated bed (basically it gradually changes colour when the heated bed is above 20°C), so most of the hardware is already in place.

    So much to do, so little time :)
     
  7. Tetrikus

    Tetrikus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    12
    I know EXACTLY what you mean. :)

    Some nice LED strips are on my todo list as well - once the main work on getting the printer working is done. But since I'm more experienced with Raspberry then with Arduino, I guess, I will do the same with the available or an additional pi.
     

Share This Page