Support Question

Discussion in 'BigBox General Chat' started by Crashbombs, Apr 19, 2016.

  1. Crashbombs

    Crashbombs Well-Known Member

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    So, this might be a dumb question, but why does support material look so solid? It seems like it is using a lot more plastic than it needs too.

    Most supports I've seen build a solid column all the way up to the piece that needs supported. I think these are generally one perimeter and fairly weak, but it still seems like extra work and filament. Why doesn't the software build more of a tree? Have a trunk then branch near the top where supports are needed. As long as the branches don't exceed 45 degrees they shouldn't need support themselves right? It might end up being solid at the top but I think it would use less material and provide the same effect.

    This is just a general question I know each program handles support differently and has nothing to do with the BB itself.
     
  2. R Design

    R Design Well-Known Member

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    If you're using Simplify 3d there is a possibility somewhat as you describe.

    Go into the "Support" tab and make the "Dense Support Layers" greater than 0.

    These are layers of "dense support" that are printed ON TOP of the regular "support" and just before your print.

    You can then set a percentage for regular support like "20%" and one for the dense support like "40%" and that will give you a sparse support structure that supports a much more tightly woven one onto which your print goes down.

    You'll probably want to set the number of Dense Support Layers to at least "3" for this to work and make sense.

    The great thing about S3d is it slices so quickly you can go through many trial iterations to get just the effect you want.
     
  3. Crashbombs

    Crashbombs Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reply! I have yet to buy S3D, I should probably do that soon in anticipation of my BB shipping lol.
     
  4. R Design

    R Design Well-Known Member

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    You won't regret it if you do.

    There's a lot to learn and just playing with it is an education.
     
  5. Col.N

    Col.N Active Member

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    Meshmixer is a free programme that will create branch like supports.
     
  6. dsiegfried

    dsiegfried Member

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    The general look and structure of your supports is going to depend on what slicing software you're using and your support settings.
    I usually use a support infill percentage of anywhere from 12% to 24% or sometimes as high as 30% depending on the part.
    Supports are generally only vertical columns; there is no software that creates a support "tree" in the way you describe, although there are some that allow you to set up supports at an angle. Craftware can do this, but it only runs the Craftbot.
     
  7. Falc.be

    Falc.be Well-Known Member

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    The latest version of cura supports conical supports, it starts out with a small base and gets wider as the layer increases, saves allot of time and material
     

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