The V6 nozzle is now the limiting system component

Discussion in 'Tool heads & ToolChanger' started by Andy Cohen, Mar 13, 2020.

  1. Andy Cohen

    Andy Cohen Well-Known Member

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    I am finally at the point with my E3D Toolchanger where I feel confident in meeting a way larger set of use cases then a single extruder system. IOWs I feel my TC is fully certified and if I wanted to I could use it within a service biz. My criteria?

    1. I can print anything a single tool machine can print... optimally.
    2. I can print an object with 100% dense break away support using contrary materials (e.g., PETG and PLA) and get the same underside quality as a Fortus or mojo with dissolvable support.
    3. I can print ALL the multi-color samples posted on Thingiverse by the Mosaic people, reliably, quickly, and without a massive purge brick. I'm also tackling stuff posted by MMU users as well.
    4. I can reliably print multi material combinations such as PLA and TPU.

    The system is reliable.
    Yet it CAN be way more reliable! How? The biggest factor IMO is the number of tool changes. The more the tool changes the higher the probability of a small defect in the print or an accident. Tool changing is more than the mechanical complications. It's also impacts the behavior of the molten material at the hotend during disposition and fusion. The smaller the tool path the more tool changing, the lower the reliability. So the idea is to minimize the tool changing.

    When I attempted to certify the Palette (which has ZERO fault tolerance in it's system design) I learned how to minimize the splices. The exact same approach can be done with the tool changer.
    I use Simplify3D. No idea if you can do this with other slicers. With S3D you can specify how many layers you want to draw a part of the object before you switch to another part. As such with my Mk8 CloneR1 I was able to set it to 5 layers per part which in turn cut the number of splices down to less then 20% of what it would be if it changed color for each part of the overall tool path. The Mk8 nozzle is a much longer and conical in shape then the V6 is. On the tool changer I have been able to save about 50% of the number of tool changes simply by using this, but because the tip of the nozzle is so shallow I can only do 2 layers per part.

    We need a nozzle with V6 threads but with a much longer cone!
     
  2. Frostie2k

    Frostie2k Member

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    How about a Airbrush nozzle? It's thin and long..
     
  3. Andy Cohen

    Andy Cohen Well-Known Member

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  4. Joe Pomo

    Joe Pomo Well-Known Member

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  5. Nibbels

    Nibbels Well-Known Member

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  6. Andy Cohen

    Andy Cohen Well-Known Member

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  7. Andy Cohen

    Andy Cohen Well-Known Member

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    I always have to use z hopping when printing multi tool prints. Same with the Palette.
     
  8. Joe Pomo

    Joe Pomo Well-Known Member

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  9. Nibbels

    Nibbels Well-Known Member

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    I know this from some guys of a german 3d print community. They told me about those nozzles like 2 years ago. This company https://www.mapa-refining.de/produkte/düsen-nozzles/ is coating nozzles in some way (like microswiss? another coat?) and they have an airbrush adapter available. I saw such a nozzle running but never printed with one myself.
    The guy once told me that the nozzle gives awsome quality but is "bitchy as a pretty princess" (I hope deepl translated this correctly)
    And he said that he will definitly try to cast a special silicone sock to be able to use a part cooling fan.
    But to be honest, what I know is rumors. I never tested if the guy just defended his special technique or if the brush nozzles are really superiour. (And there are others selling those adapters.)

    I once ordered from Mapa to get coated V6 M6-M6 heatbreaks for 3mm. Another guy once said that Mapa can coat parts that you send to them. But I dont know if coating titanium (etc.) made heatbreaks is possible. And I dont know the prices.
     
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  10. Joe Pomo

    Joe Pomo Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for sharing!

    A low-friction coating sounds like Tungsten Disulfide. Matterhackers uses this on their CleanTip nozzles. (I think E3D may use the same for NozzleX)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tungsten_disulfide
     
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  11. Andy Cohen

    Andy Cohen Well-Known Member

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    The people at Autodesk a few years back built a prototype system with 4 independent tools that ran simultaneously along 1 axis gantry. They all used a real long thin nozzle tip and they were using it to experiment with doing surface finishing... IOWs the hotend moved in all 3 axes.
    No doubt that the longer the nozzle tip the further the point of fusion is from the melt zone which may easily put it too far away to retain the right temp for good fusion. I got the Micro-swiss nozzles in and will be trying them. They sure look nice. I would bet I'll be able to go about 5 layers per part before changing tools. That will save a ton of tool changes.
    Also, I would think this kind of nozzle tip would be easier to wipe as well especially with my approach with bungee cords.
     
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