Time to build my BigBox!

Discussion in 'Build Help' started by MyMakibox, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. MyMakibox

    MyMakibox Well-Known Member

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    First print!

    OK, I haven't finished calibration and its using years-old PLA, the printer has a few temporary improvisations and hacks etc etc. And that all shows up in the print.

    But it's great to be making!


    First Print.jpg
     
  2. Old_Tafr

    Old_Tafr Well-Known Member

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    Good to see Volcano working, my experiments with Edge filament still have not produced a good print, which may well be due to slicer settings, using Simplify3D.

    I would be interested to know your impression of using Volcano with other prints as I'm assuming the benchy test print was direct from an existing gcode file?
     
    #22 Old_Tafr, Dec 7, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2017
  3. MyMakibox

    MyMakibox Well-Known Member

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    Actually, I was having too many challenges printing, so I decided to simplify.

    I switched back to the v6, put the IR probe in the standard place, and will see how it goes when I get back home in January.

    My filament options were also a struggle. I only had old PLA and new but exotic filaments (Brassfill, Copperfill, PC..).

    I've ordered some PETG as an easier option, and also a frosted-black PEI sheet.
     
  4. MyMakibox

    MyMakibox Well-Known Member

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    I'm back with BB, and starting to face new problems and implement new hacks.

    Hack-Wise, I've installed a much quieter hotted fan (Noctua), which silences the high-pitched banshee noises. Installing it required switching the fan jumper to 12V. It's inaudible, which is a big boost to the attractiveness of BB.

    One great simplification has been a new roll of PETG filament. It's proving much simpler to use then the old PLA or complex (copper fill, carbon finer, polycarbonate..) I received with the BB. It adheres fantastically well to the glass bed.

    I've had a bunch of problems with the hot-end though, including leaking filament. I damaged the heartbreak while trying to clean it all up, so after salvaging parts, my plan to implement a second hot-end is further delayed.
     
  5. Spoon Unit

    Spoon Unit Well-Known Member

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    I love that your first print is with a volcano :). I would personally consider this to be an advanced challenge that you will probably have more success with once you're confident about how the printer works with a standard v6 hotend and small nozzles. That said, your print isn't bad considering. Another thing I think needs to be said is that that raft looks huge. You can print without a raft, which you probably think is completely nuts right now. The only thing is that, with glass alone, you'll probably need something to aid adhesion, such as a glue stick or hairspray. After closing on two years now with the BB, I've tried quite a few things, and can see that the PEI-covered Aluminium heatbed, with Alex's design for cutting, was one of the most significant upgrades I made that increased the quality of life with the printer. Almost everything sticks without a problem, with no additional surface coating, and close to no cleanup process required (perhaps just a little alcohol wipedown from time to time. Before that, on the plain glass bed, the best results I had were with hairspray, which was probably the simplest to clean off every 10 or so prints, but which required the glass bed to make a trip to the sink. Also, a word of warning as you think about PETG directly on the glass. Sooner or later your glass will probably chip with that combination. It may have already. PETG seems to actually merge with the glass. If you're going to continue with PETG, consider something between the glass and the PETG, like glue stick or hairspray. Personally, I would never trust PETG on glass even with glue stick or hairspray. I've also used Print Bite, which a few others here are using. It's about half the price of the Alu bed for enough to cover the glass bed. Get a second glass bed perhaps if you're not comfortable putting it on your only bed. Word of warning with PrintBite, don't be impatient with it ever. Wait for the print to fully cool before trying to remove (well just removing) a print. If you're impatient, you'll create some small blebs in the surface, which will still print fine, but will tarnish the perfection otherwise possibly on the first layer. The Alu is more forgiving, never warps, but it more on the initial outlay.
     
  6. Old_Tafr

    Old_Tafr Well-Known Member

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    Uhu glue with a little water and spread with a (medium bristle :) ) toothbrush first in small circles to get an even covering and then in continuous strokes from one side to the other to get an even thin coating works like a dream.

    Once dried it forms an almost clear, thin, smooth coating, works with Edge for at least ten prints, release print when cooling or when cold with a long thin bendy craft knife blade (with the blade in a handle/holder)

    If you use too much Uhu then you get white blobs, a little experimentation is needed to cover with the right quantity.

    After a number of prints a little water allows you to spread it again as some is removed where the print is and by the use of a blade.
     
  7. MyMakibox

    MyMakibox Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Old_Tafr, that approach has worked well.

    However, I'm terribly frustrated with the BigBox. At this stsge, I've spent vastly more time diagnosing and fixing aspects of it than printing.
     
  8. Ephemeris

    Ephemeris Well-Known Member

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    3D printing IS frustrating so it's not just you nor the BigBox :)

    On the other hand, the BigBox can be made to work extremely well and we still have people around who know how to get you there.

    Bottom line, be methodical and don't be afraid to ask for help.
     
  9. dc42

    dc42 Well-Known Member

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    IMO the key to reliable 3D printing is to refine your printer by identifying and eliminating the weak points that give you problems. Weak points are often mechanical, but may also encompass electronics and firmware. I spent a year eliminating the weak points of my Cartesian printer (an Ormerod with mostly mechanical issues), and almost 2 years eliminating the weak points of my delta printer (initially firmware and then mechanical problems). I am now at the point at which I can say "It just works" for both printers, most of the time. My SCARA printer hasn't quite reached that point, but it is close.

    So don't give up! Identify what is causing you grief, and fix that aspect.
     
  10. MyMakibox

    MyMakibox Well-Known Member

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    I think the biggest problem I'm grappling with - and one that has caused a lot of others - is a problem with the PT100. It suddenly jumps up a few dozen or hundred degrees without explanation, which causes MAXTEMP or the PID to shut off the heater, causing the real hotend to cool and filament jam.

    I'm casing the cause is wiring, but I don't know what to do about it.

    Here's an example from Octoprint of what happened before a filament jam.

    PT100.jpeg
     
  11. mhe

    mhe Well-Known Member

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    My guess would be you have a problem with the wiring of your temp sensor. You could try to PID autotune as well if you haven't done so already but the spikes look pretty pointy. If the PID tuning doesn't solve it, I'd replace the PT100 or the amplifier board for it provided you use the stock Bigbox electronics. In the end I switched to Duet electronics and have never looked back. They are the best thing money can buy hands down.
     
  12. Ephemeris

    Ephemeris Well-Known Member

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    Hotend temperature shooting to zero like that implies one of few thing things, From most to least likely:
    • PT100 is shorting out
    • The PT100 signal conditioning board is failing
    • Something is wrong with the connection between the RUMBA and the PT100 signal conditioner board
    • Aliens
    I'd really focus on number one. The PT100 leads are ridiculously too small for an application like this. As I recall they're either single strand (solid) 28 or 30 gauge wire. Stupidly dainty, easy to break.

    Take a really close look at where the wires come out of the PT100 cartridge. Are bare leads exposed in a way that might enable them to touch each other or both touch the shield or heater block?

    I would not waste a lot of time on this. If you can't find a cause, the best use of your time and money is ordering a replacement PT100. Installing it will be a little different because E3D replaced the long instrumentation style leads (2 wires inside a braided shield) with an even more fragile but easier to work on 2-lead design.

    Editorial Aside: I really REALLY wish and advise E3D to get PT100s made with more robust leads. Say 24 awg. This would save users a huge amount of grief and reduce their reputation for fragile wiring.
     
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  13. jfb

    jfb Well-Known Member

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    Looks similar to an issue I had last year. One of the wires to PT100 seemed to be the problem - the resistance changed significantly as I moved the wire around. Might be worth checking that. The wire is very delicate, and needs to be secured to reduce/eliminate strain.

    Simplest solution if that's the issue is really to replace the PT100.
     
  14. jfb

    jfb Well-Known Member

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    This! Definitely this! Shielded too, please :)
     
  15. MyMakibox

    MyMakibox Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tips. I'm finding it very hard to diagnose the problem exactly, as temperature readings seem fine when the BigBox is cool. The massive jumps only seem to occur well into a print. I seem to be able to influence it by poking the wires, but numerous attempts to secure the connector and wiring have been unfruitful.

    I'm taking the advice of jfb and Ephemeris to move on, and have ordered one of these: hopefully the simpler wiring will prove more robust.

    Trianglelab-PT100.jpg
     
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  16. Ephemeris

    Ephemeris Well-Known Member

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    Ooh! Nice find! I like the long leads WITHOUT a connector. Much easier to adapt for my needs :)
     
  17. MyMakibox

    MyMakibox Well-Known Member

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    Well, I got the replacement PT100 and it does seem more solidly built than the one that came with the BigBox. A print is well underway, so it seems to be working well also.

    PT100s.jpg
     
    Ephemeris likes this.
  18. Ephemeris

    Ephemeris Well-Known Member

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    Mine arrived as well. Looks to be 24awg stranded with fiberglass? insulation
     

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