Trying to set up a heated chamber for the TC

Discussion in 'Tool heads & ToolChanger' started by chrys, Apr 22, 2021.

  1. chrys

    chrys Member

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    I'm in the process of building a heated enclosure for my TC. What do you think?

    I was planning on not using the back panel on the TC so the electronics are exposed. Then I built a wooden box that has a space for the back of the printer to poke out and I'm trying to seal up the sides as best as I can.

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    I'm planning on using a hair dryer as the heating element, but I'm not quite sure yet. The box is going to be so well insulated that It won't need much help getting 50+c. I want to be able to run it at around 50c (depending on materiel) for 2/3 of the tools and then more like 70/80c for the one high temp tool. The high temp tool is going to be a liquid cooled direct drive extruder/hotend. The other tools are a simple direct drive and bowden that are air cooled.

    I've been experimenting with a heated chamber with a Prusa Mini and I've gotten really great, warp free prints out of prusamnets PC blend, some nylon blends, etc running it up to 50c depending on material. The prints are really durable and the finish is great. Unfortunately and predictably I had a catastrophic melt down that I'm trying to fix now, but I digress.

    How do you think the TC will handle being in the hotbox? I'm printing all the plastic parts in PC and doing other things to protect the electronics (see pics).

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    I plan on liquid cooling this stepper

    Any feedback on my approach to keeping the heat inside the box while keeping the electronics out of the heat and as cool as possible?

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    The thin layer is fiberglass backed aluminum heat shield material and the thick layer is a heat shield meant to be under a car hood. I don't want the heat shielding to interfere with any function or preclude a takedown/rebuild.

    The box itself has a frame that is oak and maple and the siding is MDF. I think it would insulate very well on its own and with the added insulation it will be really good at getting hot and staying hot without much intervention. It may actually get too hot.
     
  2. Joe Pomo

    Joe Pomo Well-Known Member

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    Nice work so far! I don't have much to add, but I'm curious how the linear rails react to the heated environment. For instance, the different coefficients of expansion for the aluminum gantry bar, and the steel guide rail for the tool-changer. To somewhat manage this, I thought about flipping the top-plate over and insulating the entire interior. A lot of adjustments would need to be made though, since the tool-changer itself would be upside down.

    There are a handful of people doing high-temp builds on the Duet forum that might be of interest. (I don't have any links to share, however).
     
    Chris M. Christian likes this.
  3. chrys

    chrys Member

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    Here are some updated pictures. I'm still in the middle of commissioning and getting the Chamber Heating element set up. I'm not sure what to be using as a heater, but this is my current idea:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07JKNKK7J/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I'm not sure if I need a second or more powerful PSU. Other than that it's pretty much ready to start printing. I'm saving the 4th tool for a subtractive tool that I've yet to set up.

    1.jpg
    Here is the front of the printer in its enclosure. It took a good hour to smush it into the enclosure so the seal seems to be pretty tight and the electronics are outside of the chamber.

    2.jpg 2.1.jpg
    I'm setting this up as a high temp tool. The extruder is more beefy than the standard Hemera so I had to make some changes to the docks. I'm not sure if it will work, but I've been able to get the tools changing.

    3.jpg
    This is a Hemera with a pretty busted attempt at getting some liquid cooling.


    4.01.jpg 4.jpg
    This the Bowden tool. It also ended up being wider than the standard because I am using a 40mm fan. I'm not sure if it will work when it's hot inside but we'll see.

    5.jpg 7.jpg 6.jpg 8.jpg
    Here is most of the cooling. I'm trying to use liquid for everything that I can that will be inside the hot box.
    9.jpg 10.jpg 11.jpg 13.jpg 12.jpg
    Here is the back and all of the additional cooling. This all sticks out of the of enclosure.
     
    Greg Holloway likes this.
  4. W1EBR.Gene

    W1EBR.Gene Well-Known Member

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    @chrys , what about the belts and the lubricants? Will they stand up to the heat ok?
     
  5. chrys

    chrys Member

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    I'm not really sure. I'm sure everything will wear faster for the heat, but I'm not sure if the belts and lube that come with it are going to be okay in the chamber. I expect to be doing a lot of printing around the 45-60 degree range.
     
  6. chrys

    chrys Member

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    So basically what I'm trying to say is that I am pretty sure the printer will work but also pretty sure it will wear faster on everything. Any thoughts?

    I believe the belts are steel core which seems to bode well for durability, but I def expect the heat to have a negative effect on overall durability for everything.

    I'm pretty much a novice with most things involved with the building of this so I am very open to and in fact dying for some input from others. I'm surprised with the lack of heated chamber set ups I've been able to find online. I have a Prusa Mini set up in a little hot box that I usually run around 50c. I've reprinted all of the load bearing plastic parts in the Prusa Polycarbonate blend and nylon because the original PETG parts stared to warp in the hot box. I didn't move any of the electronics outside of the chamber and that printer runs very well. I did add a liquid cooled hotend which was a game changer. I've been running that printer pretty hot and hard and it's going strong. I've used this same PC blend for all of the printer parts that will be inside the hotbox for my tool changer setup, but I do want to run the tool changer hotter than 50c.

    so..... do you have any thoughts on the durability of the stock parts in a 45-65c chamber? Also, any thoughts on the heating element/power combo conundrum?
     
    #7 chrys, Jun 18, 2021
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2021
  7. Greg Holloway

    Greg Holloway Administrator
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    wow, that's quite the build!

    The lowest rated component is the toolhead stepper motor, which if I remember right is rated to 60C. The other parts should be good to about 80C. Other things to consider will be the lubricants, expecially those on the rails.
     
  8. chrys

    chrys Member

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    I just finally got the heating system working and tuned! I will see about the grease. If not, it shouldn't be hard to find suitable grease.
     
    Greg Holloway likes this.
  9. tr1gger88

    tr1gger88 Member

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    I used Stego HGL 046 fan heaters for an other heated build chamber printer build. You can get them pretty cheap on Ebay ($50ish).

    Great looking build, I'm looking forward to seeing the resulting prints.
     

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